8 Cringeworthy B2B Email Nurturing Mistakes that Leave Your Leads Dead in the Water

According to Gleanster Research, 50% of qualified leads aren’t ready to buy. 

Okay, so if they are interacting with your website, but they aren’t ready to buy, what are they doing? They are likely researching solutions to solve their problems and considering several options prior to making a purchase decision. 

The way that we as marketers help leads through the buyer’s journey, is by leveraging email nurture sequences, also known as lead nurturing. Lead Nurturing by definition is the process of building effective relationships with potential customers throughout the buying journey. 

One to one direct communication with all B2B leads isn’t scalable, but using nurture email sequencing is, and it’s effective. The caveat? Email nurturing must be strategic. 

Here are 8 B2B email nurturing mistakes that will tank your conversion rates and leave your leads dead in the water.  

B2B email nurturing mistakes

Mistake #1: Not Having a Lead Email Nurturing Campaign at All

Every B2B company needs lead nurturing one way or another. Not convinced? Start by asking yourself these questions:

  1. Do you have content available for download?
  2. Do you have a chatbot?
  3. Do you have a ‘Contact Us’ form on your website?
  4. Do you offer a demo or webinar?
  5. Do you a newsletter sign up?

If you answered yes to any of the above, email nurture sequences are for you. They do some of the heavy lifting by giving the potential buyer the information they need to help themselves, yet still provide them with the opportunity to easily raise their hand for sales. 

And let’s face it, if you’re not nurturing them, another company likely will and your lead will be drawn elsewhere.

Mistake #2: Forgoing Strategy and Research 

Nothing can turn your leads away faster than poorly targeted random marketing emails. Let strategy and research fuel your persona development and help you craft your marketing plan at large. Email lead nurturing should roll up nicely and be aligned across teams.

Interested in how Lake One does strategy? Here’s what we include.

Mistake #3: Not Using Personalization

Make sure your emails sound like they were written by a human being for another human being to read. 

Related Reading: Best Practices for Writing B2B Sales Emails

If you’re using a marketing automation software like HubSpot, you’ve likely collected data that can be easily inserted into your emails to add a personal touch. It can be as simple as addressing the email with their first name or you can take it a step further. Do you know their role? Their job title? The more insights you can glean from your leads, the more tailored you can make your emails. 

Also, here’s a fun fact. 

B2B Email Nurturing Mistakes

Mistake #4: Death by Sales Pitch 

Not all leads are ready to buy the second they begin interacting with your brand, so hang tight on transcribing your elevator pitch.  

It’s important to meet personas where they are at in the buyer’s journey by providing relevant, helpful content. Videos, blogs, additional resources, case studies, and customer testimony are perfect tidbits that can be shared via email nurture campaigns.

Are sales pitches ever appropriate? Absolutely. There comes a point in the nurture sequence, which should be determined by user engagement, where you absolutely ‘ask for the sale’. Here are some ways to do that.

Mistake #5: CTA Overload

Every email should have at least one clear call-to-action (CTA), but too many CTAs can be a distraction. Not to mention, it makes for an ugly email. 

Pro Tip: If you’re unclear about the purpose of your email, the lead likely will be too. Take a step back and list out the email subject, primary CTA and secondary CTAs if you have them, in a doc prior to building out your sequence. 

Mistake #6: Radio Silence When Leads Engage 

This one seems simple enough, but you’d be surprised how often email replies go unanswered. If a lead replies to your nurture sequence, where does it go? Who checks the inbox? Whose responsibility is it to reply? Make sure to have a game plan in place prior to launching.

What’s worse than silence? Any of these mistakes!

Mistake #7: Thinking Lead Nurturing is One and Done

The more blogs I write, the more I feel like a broken record that’s stuck on research and optimization. But it’s so true. Lead nurture emails are perfect candidates for optimization and should be based on research.

Not sure where to start the optimization process? Let the data be your guide vs intuition. Subject lines, CTAs, and email timing are all great optimization candidates if the data points are lackluster.

Mistake #8: Keeping Sales in the Dark 

Lead conversion is a team effort and often a result of both the sales and marketing team working towards the same goals

Lead Scoring Guide

When it comes to workflows and email nurture, it’s especially critical that sales and marketing align and have a system in place to signify when a lead is actively talking to sales or vice versa. Nothing can confuse or in some cases, annoy your leads more than emails from several people at the same company. Not sure if you’re aligned? Here are some tips to check.

The good news, this can be easily avoided if you’re using HubSpot by leveraging enrollment criteria, lists, and lead status. 

Practical Ways to Implement A/B Testing on Conversion Funnels

A conversion funnel is what we call the path a user follows to convert on a landing page. You can read more about the basics here, but the parts that make up a conversion funnel are the CTA, Landing Page, Thank You Page, and the Thank You Email. As marketers and business people, we want people to convert, but sometimes our marketing underperforms or our guts say that good performance could be better. So then we test. Here are practical ways to implement A/B testing on conversion funnels and improve their performance. 

Implement A/B Testing

A/B Testing CTAs

CTA testing in HubSpot could not be any easier. By creating two versions of your CTAs- A and B- HubSpot will naturally serve the CTAs equally. When running multivariate CTA testing, we’re focusing the majority of our attention on the Click Rates because clicks are the main goal of a CTA. Submission rates are a secondary factor because they are mostly an indication of your landing page performance. The caveat here is relevance, though. High clicks and low submission rates can be an indication that the promise of your CTA is incongruent with that of your landing page. The messaging of one or the other may need to be adjusted. 

Not all leads are created equal! Download our Lead Scoring Guide to learn how to automate your lead qualification.

In this example, version A and B were created at the same time. After a few months of testing, both have nearly identical views, but the clicks on version B are a full percentage point higher. At this point, since we have a decent amount of data, it might be time to create a new version “A” to see if we can beat or at least match version B.

Implement A/B Testing

A/B Testing Landing Pages

HubSpot also makes implementing A/B testing on landing pages super easy. What you’re looking at when testing landing pages are submissions. WordStream tells us we want 10% or higher to be considered among the best. Some of the things you could vary are your headlines and copy. You can even try testing the medium of your offer- guide vs eBook vs infographic etc.- to see what your audience is more compelled to utilize.

One of the biggest advantages to A/B testing a landing page is to see how the length of a form affects your submissions. As marketers, we of course want as much data as we can get, but we also know that there’s a breaking point in what we request. High-value offers have a higher threshold for longer forms. To test, create two variants of your landing page- one with a shorter form and one with a more complex form- to find out where your persona’s threshold is. If you can get away with having a longer form and requesting more information without your submissions rates suffering, go for it.

If you’re not sure where to start with your landing page testing, you can try setting up heat mapping to see exactly how your users are interacting with your page. You might find people are leaving right away (a better headline or more appealing design, perhaps?) or abandoning the form (shorten that sucker up!). Bounce rates can also indicate where to start.

Bonus: are your landing pages optimized for SEO? Learn more about it here.

A/B Testing Thank You Pages

You create Thank You Pages (TYPs) variants the same way you do Landing Pages in HubSpot. So what are you looking for here? Engagement. You want people to access their offer (via a link or a button) and then go on to engage with the site. This is where you have the opportunity to move them through the funnel or charm them with delight. You can create full variants of your TYP or try testing a CTA within your TYP as we discussed above. 

A/B Testing Thank You Emails (Kind of)

Thank You Emails are the automated emails that send after a user submits a form. They can be set up directly on the landing page form or via a workflow. Unfortunately, you cannot implement A/B testing of automated emails in HubSpot. But, there are a few ways to get around it. What you want to measure by testing thank you emails are your open rates and click rates.

Lead Scoring Guide

Open rates are correlated to the strength of your subject line. To test, benchmark your current views and opens then manually make and publish your updates to the same email. Allow your updates to gather data and then measure performance against your benchmarked data. Rinse and repeat.

You can test the click rates in your thank you emails by creating multivariate CTAs as discussed in the CTA section above. You can also manually update the copy and hyperlinks to your “next step” offer (whatever action you’ve included in your TYE that you want your user to take next such as downloading a different offer or contacting you for a consult). Benchmark your stats and revisit often to check the efficacy of your updates. 

The 5-Step Blueprint to Building Conversion Paths

Conversion funnel by definition can mean a few different things depending on the source, but here at Lake One, when we talk about conversion funnel as it relates to an inbound marketing program, we’re talking about the call-to-action, landing page, thank you page, and follow-up email that supports our inbound efforts. 

Read on to learn more about the key components of a conversion funnel along with some insider tips for implementation.  

conversion funnel

Call-to-Actions

With content consumption at an all-time high among consumers, Call-to-Actions (CTAs) are uber important. 

In Marketing, a call-to-action (CTA) is an instruction to your target buyer designed to provoke an immediate response. Figuratively speaking, CTAs are a hand wave or an arrow saying, “Hey! Look over here. We have something you might like!” 

CTAs use action words to direct the user. For example, ‘download this white paper now’, ‘click here’ and ‘watch the video’. There are so many examples of CTAs, but a few elements stay consistent across the board.

  • Headline: Write a header that makes it clear and easy to see what it is you’re offering.
  • Sub Header: Explain the value to the user of what you’re offering, but keep it concise. Space is limited. 
  • Image: Include an image that relates to what you’re offering to catch the user’s eye and add additional context.
  • Action Words: Here’s where you actually say what action you want the user to take (download here) typically called out by a button or highlighted differently in some way.

Below is an example of a Lake One’s CTAs. Go ahead. Click on it 

LinkedIn Marketing Guide

Landing Page 

Although the majority of B2B businesses are using landing pages, not all landing pages are created equal. 

Landing pages are different than your other website pages for a few reasons and should contain at a minimum, the following elements.

No Page Navigation

Landing pages should be designed to be lean mean converting machines and the full navigation menu can distract users. We want them to submit the form and get down to business. 

Above the Fold

Keep the main gist of your offer (body copy, image, form, CTA, etc.) above the fold. If the CTA is below the fold and requires a scroll, conversion rates could suffer. You want to make it as easy as possible for the user to convert.

Landing Page Copy

The copy should have a header, a subheader, a few sentences that explain your offering in more detail, and then roughly 3 – 5 supporting bullets that talk about the user benefits of your offer and what the user can expect by submitting the form.

Image

Include an image on your landing page that depicts the offer. The image should be sized appropriately and placed in close proximity to the copy and the CTA making sure to add value and not distract the user from converting.

Here’s an example of the type of image we like to use. Click to see the full funnel in use.

conversion funnel

Form

Forms are an absolute must. They are the method you’ll use to capture the lead’s information in exchange for whatever your offering. Make sure that your ask matches the value of the offer. For example, if you have a form 10 questions deep for an infographic, you’ll likely scare away your user.

Insider Tip: My favorite form field is ‘Role’. Role is imperative because it essentially identifies the lead by persona. Role identification allows us to better tailor our workflows, and, not to mention, it gives us better insight into who is actually submitting our forms and engaging with our content. Oh and the bonus is, we’ve found that ‘Role’ is a light ask for the user as it doesn’t hold the same trepidation that company name or phone number can.

Needing help setting up your conversion funnels and forms might be a sign it’s time to hire a digital marketing agency. Learn about the other indicators here.

CTA 

All landing pages must have a CTA that’s clearly visible and intuitive to the user as to what they’re getting and what step to do next. 

Truthfully, the above just scratches the surface on the information available on landing pages and best practices. Here is an awesome infographic by Unbouncedescribing additional elements of a landing page if you want to learn more. 

Thank You Page

Some conversion funnel implementations don’t use a ‘Thank You Page’ (TYP), but we are big fans. In short, a TYP is just that- a page thanking the now lead for submitting their information via the form to obtain whatever it was you were offering. The TYP also hosts an actual link to the file, guide, case study, etc. 

If you’re peeking ahead and seeing that we deploy a follow-up email that also contains the asset link and thinking TYPs are pointless, they aren’t! TYPs have an important job and here are a few highlights on what they bring to your conversion funnel:

  • Trust: For some leads, submitting information via the form in hopes of obtaining an asset can feel a little uncomfortable. They are likely wondering if they’ll actually get the asset, will they start getting spammed and harassed, etc. TYPs are a chance to build trust with your lead by showing them you’ll give them what you promised and you’ll do it fast. 

Learn more about lead follow up strategies here.

  • Conversion: TYPs have prime real estate for additional CTAs. Make sure the CTAs are relevant and helpful in aiding in the next step of the buyer’s journey. Also, insider tip: Make sure the CTAs are not interfering with the user clicking on the asset to download it. It can go from helpful to intrusive quickly.
  • Brand & Site Exploration: Unlike landing pages, TYPs have a full navigation menu and can incorporate links to the company’s social media pages as well. It’s a chance for the lead to explore more on their own.
  • Tracking: Without getting too technical for the sake of this post, the TYP is a perfect place to fire your conversion pixel for tracking. Why? Because in order for the TYP to render, the form submission must be completed. You get the lead’s info, they get the asset. Bam. Conversion.

Follow-Up Email

Follow-up emails consist of a direct link to the piece of content (or whatever the CTA promised) and then an additional CTA to interact with your brand an additional way like a newsletter sign up or to check out your blog.

The emails are pretty simple, but we send them for a few reasons. 

  • User Experience: For example, if your offer is a download of a white paper, how convenient for the lead is it to have the white paper sent to their inbox vs needing to download it and save it right away? 
  • Conversion: It opens the door of communication with the lead via email and provides them with more ways to convert and interact with your brand right from their inbox. 
  • Lead Nurturing: Simple follow up emails can be a great segway into lead nurturing as the lead will have already received their first email from you. It seems more natural after sending the high-value first email to continue a cadence.

Key Takeaways

In summary, now that you know about the elements of a conversion funnel, here are a few reminders to take with you if you put the elements above into practice.

SEO. SEO. SEO.

All conversion funnel elements must be optimized for SEO. Think images, landing pages, meta descriptions, URLs, etc. All of it. 

Optimize. Rinse. Repeat.

Nothing in marketing is set it and forget it, including conversion funnels. Let the numbers be your optimization compass. They’ll point you to where you need to focus your attention first.

Marketing is for Humans.

When in doubt, always remember you’re content was created for humans and so were your conversion funnels. Where is your eye naturally drawn? Can you understand what you’re offering quickly and easily? A little humanity gut check can go a long way.

5 Signs Inbound Marketing is Right for Your Business

You probably already get the gist of inbound marketing if you’re reading this (here’s a refresher if you don’t). But how do you know if it’s right for your business? Here are five telltale signs that inbound marketing is right for you.

Inbound Marketing is Right

1) Your (Potential) Customers are Online

Let’s be honest, your customers are online. Even the majority of B2B purchase decisions are made online now. The expectation of all users is that you have a website that is not only easy on the eyes and simple to navigate but also answers their questions and provides value. Inbound marketing is a way to meet your consumers where they already are (online) rather than trying to find them via hit and miss traditional methods like radio or print.

What do you need to get started with inbound? Grab our checklist.

2) You’re Not Getting Enough Leads

The biggest complaint from salespeople is usually that they aren’t getting enough leads. Understandable. No leads, no sales. Inbound can be a great solution to that problem.

The inbound method aims to move buyers through the funnel at three different stages: awareness (top), consideration (middle), and decision (bottom). While there are many different ways you can help buyers along this journey, they usually involve collecting information from a user in exchange for whatever you’re offering. This is called lead generation. Once you have the contact info of a user, you can market to them personally via things like workflows to help nudge them along into becoming a customer.

is inbound marketing right

3) You’re Not Getting Enough Website Traffic

Perhaps you’re getting leads through things like cold-calling, word of mouth, or repeat business, and the problem is that your website is a wasteland. This is a big sign inbound might be right for your organization. I’ll try to stay at a high-level here, but the way that inbound moves people along the funnel as mentioned above is by offering useful, informative content that your potential buyers want. This information should be targeted to answer your buyer’s questions, make them feel empowered, and show how your product can solve their problems. So how does this help traffic?

Well, people are actively looking for their answers online. In theory, the content created through an inbound strategy (blogs, webinars, ebooks, etc.) will be filled with the keywords and phrases your users are putting into Google to find your type of solution. By creating content that matches these search queries, your content/website will start ranking higher and higher in the search results.

A bonus to inbound is that search engines favor sites that post fresh content regularly. Therefore, posting new blog content frequently in and of itself can help your search rankings.

4) Your Competitors are Beating You

is inbound marketing right

How can they beat you? Let me count the ways. It could be that your competitor’s website is a work of user-experience art, smartly crafted to guide users into a purchase while yours is… not. Or maybe it’s that they rank higher on every search term than you do, getting all the clicks you wish you had. OR maybe it’s that your competition is encroaching on revenue that used to be yours after they started buying up ad space you didn’t know was even available.

Inbound? Yeah… it can help with all of those things.

5) You Want to Generate Thought Leadership and Authority

Another sign that inbound marketing might be right for your company is that you want to generate thought leadership or be known as an authority in your field. Thought leaders are, “the informed opinion leaders and the go-to people in their field of expertise.” Inbound inherently generates thought leadership (assuming you do in fact know your industry and are able to produce high-quality content) by the sheer volume of content you produce. Your content naturally gives you a platform to show off your industry knowledge and expertise.

How to Pick the Best Digital Marketing Agency for Your Company

Key Takeaways that Inbound Marketing Might be Right for You

  1. Your would-be customers are online (but you’re missing them).
  2. You’re not generating enough leads to make sales happy.
  3. Your website traffic isn’t good enough.
  4. The competition is smoking you.
  5. You want to be a thought leader and authority in your industry.

Four 2019 Marketing Trends You Can Count On

If you’ve been paying attention, the most likely 2019 marketing trends will come as no surprise. With an over-arching theme to connect to consumers personally, we expect 2019 to be filled with content intended to engage and meet consumers where they are rather than getting in their face. Here are the four trends we’d like to call attention to for the upcoming year.

Continue reading “Four 2019 Marketing Trends You Can Count On”

Why Inbound Marketing Works: It’s all About Your Buyer

You’ve likely heard the term, “inbound marketing”. Broken down in its simplest form, it’s the idea of attracting your buyers with valuable, helpful content vs pushing product and leading with a sale.

In this post, you’ll learn the definition of inbound marketing, the buyer’s journey, the methodology behind inbound marketing, and why it’s so popular with not only marketers but buyers.

Inbound Marketing Defined

Inbound Marketing

It’s nearly impossible to talk about inbound marketing without mentioning HubSpot. Brian Halligan, the CEO of HubSpot, coined the term “inbound marketing” back in 2006. Inbound marketing is a marketing strategy focused on attracting customers through relevant and helpful content by adding value at every stage in the customer’s buying journey. HubSpot says we need to nurture our customers from the time they are “strangers” to our business all the way to equipping them to be our “promoters.”

Already running inbound marketing? Download our Inbound Marketing Campaign Checklist. Never miss a critical campaign component. 

Buyer’s Journey

Okay, so what’s the buyer’s journey? The buyer’s journey is the active research process a buyer goes through to become aware of, consider, and then ultimately purchase a new product or service. The buyer’s journey is categorized into three steps:

Awareness Stage: The buyer realizes they have a problem.

Consideration Stage: The buyer has been able to name the problem and begins to search for a solution to their pain.

Decision Stage: The buyer decides on a solution.

“Inbound Marketing is the best way to turn strangers into customers and promoters of your business. ” [Click to Tweet!]

Inbound Marketing Methodology

There are four main phases of the inbound methodology all moving towards the goal of using content to draw consumers toward your website where they can learn more about what you sell on their own terms. Their own terms meaning someone searching a question on Google vs. a tv commercial in the middle of their favorite show. Each step of the way requires tweaking of tactics to achieve the overall strategy. In order to do this, we closely follow their Four Phases of Inbound Methodology.

Phase 1: Attract

The first part of the inbound marketing methodology is to attract the right visitors to your site at the right time. Inbound puts your brand in front of prospects when they are actually in the process of looking for what you have to deliver which in the case of inbound, comes to them through meaningful, helpful, relevant content that helps them along their buyer’s journey.

Some crucial tools in attracting the right users to your site:

  • Buyer persona development
  • Search engine optimization
  • Keywords/content strategy
  • Blogging
  • Social media marketing

Social Media Inbound Marketing

Phase 2: Convert

The convert phase is where you have already attracted your ideal buyer persona to your website (through content) and now, you need to convert them into a qualified lead by having them submit their contact information on your website via a form. Once they submit their contact information, they can join your marketing sales funnel. The key here is matching the information requested with the value of the offered content. It should be an equal exchange.

Key elements in converting users on your site:

  • Premium Content Offers (ebooks, white papers, checklists, how-tos)
  • Optimized landing pages
  • Calls-to-Action (CTAs)
  • Forms to capture user information

Phase 3: Close

This stage is critical. Essentially you are closing the sale, money in the bank. However, closing a lead and converting them into a customer can be a long process and varies from industry to industry so there isn’t a magic formula that can be applied. We can though, take advantage of some important tools to better ensure success.

Important tools to close leads into customers:

Buyers Journey - Inbound Marketing

Phase 4: Delight

Just because you get the sale, doesn’t mean that the inbound process is finished and that your is work is done. It’s quite the opposite. Inbound marketing calls for the continuation of customer engagement, delight, upselling, and ultimately growing your customer base into happy promoters of your company.

Must-have tactics for delighting your customers are:

Do customer’s coming to you, sound too good to be true? It’s not! It’s real and it works. The inbound methodology is quickly becoming a popular strategy as audiences are changing and so are their buying habits. Customer’s expectations are higher than ever before as they are demanding a more personal, tailored relationship with the company they purchase from.

Inbound Works with the Modern Buyer

With inbound marketing, you aren’t blasting a one size fits all message on an overcrowded channel. Instead, you are crafting helpful relevant content designed to address the problems and needs of your ideal customers.  Thoughtful content creation builds trust and boosts your business’ overall creditability with your consumers.

Inbound consumers have changed their expectations of how they want to interact with marketing material. Consumers have a lot more control than they used to with changing technology. There’s now ways consumers can block and avoid unwanted marketing tactics fairly easily such as tv commercials, pop-up ads, mailers, and telemarketers. If customers are actively avoiding your outbound tactics, it renders them useless.

via GIPHY

Given the state of the state, targeting specific personas with well-researched content tailored to their problems and pains is way more likely to be effective and earn their attention.

Inbound marketing at its core is a process, which is designed to be easily scaled, replicated, and optimized. Attract, Convert, Close, Delight, and Repeat.

Ready to get to work planning your next digital Inbound Marketing plan, but need a little inspiration? Check out our Free Ebook – 32 Enviable Inbound Marketing Examples.

Enviable Inbound Marketing Examples Ebook

Secrets of Top Construction Company Websites Revealed

From residential to commercial, the buying process for building and construction trades is changing. No matter your role in building, whether you are a contractor, designer or vendor, at the heart of mapping out your construction marketing strategy sits your website. It’s time to rethink the critical role it plays in attracting, converting and retaining construction customers, B2C and B2B.

Top Construction Websites

Your domain is the hub where research is done and your pipeline funnel gets filled up. It’s no longer enough to just have a portfolio or brochure style website. But what are the must haves? Instead of telling you, we’ll show you. Here are three examples of websites from the building and construction industry that are doing it right. We’ll break down who they are and why their websites are something to aspire to for brands looking to up their marketing game.

Why do websites need to be updated? Because most people visiting them aren’t ready to buy. Digital media has put buyers in the driver seat, completing an overwhelming majority of their research before they ever reach out to a brand through their website or sales team. That means in order to connect with prospects, websites need to be refactored to provide value early in the buyer’s journey, and opportunities to convert prospects beyond “contact us” or “request a quote”.

Websites need to be refactored to provide value early in the buyer’s journey and with opportunities to convert prospects beyond “contact us” or “request a quote”. #ConstructionMarketing #ContentMarketing  [Click to Tweet]

Superwarm

Superwarm is a UK based gas boiler and central heating systems installer. As a home services vendor, they need to compete with a sea of other heating vendors – so being found, building brand and building pipeline is critical.

What their website does well

Superwarm is a great example of a full funnel, modern marketing journey to emulate. First, their website is fine-tuned for conversion driving visitors to “get a free quote”.

But as we established in our opening paragraphs, it’s not enough to just make it easy for people to reach out for a quote. Only a small percentage of your visitors are ready for this stage. To build a scalable, forecastable marketing machine, we need a marketing strategy and website that maps to your buyers’ needs throughout their journey. Here’s how that looks at Superwarm.

First, they create blog content that addresses various questions buyers may have at various stages of the buyer journey. As a refresher, we think of the journey in three segments: awareness, consideration and decision.

The blog posts attract traffic from organic search, social media, email and potential paid media (search, social and display ads).

As a reader scrolls through the post, they are offered an opt-in, a bonus piece of content from a library of resources, also mapped to their stage in the buyer journey.

These offers help educate the buyer, providing value but also help Superwarm build a marketing database of prospects they can market to and nurture.

how to build a website that converts

PorchCo

The Porch Company is both an online store, offering porch components for building as well as a construction team.

What their website does well

The Porch Company is a prolific blogger. I mean – prolific in focus and volume. Just look at their category structure and number of posts.

Yes, 52 posts on blog design, at first glance I’m already sold on their authority on porches.

But here’s where this gets really awesome. If you dig into their content – it’s really really focused. So often we run into the “I’ve blogged for 6 months and nothing has happened so I give up” syndrome.

Here’s the deal. Your blogging tactic is failing as part of your overall digital strategy for 1 (or all) of 3 reasons.

  1. You don’t stick with it. Blogging and content is about the long game. Each month builds exponentially on the month before in terms of traffic and lead generation capacity. Here’s what that looks like in terms of growth over time based on research conducted by HubSpot.
  2. Your content is haphazard. Blogging for blogging sake isn’t helpful. It needs to be tied to your buyer personas, their buying journey and the topic you are trying to rank for. That means you have a lot to think about as you plan out your content strategy. You can’t just pick topics to write about willy-nilly.
  3. Your content isn’t supported with promotion. The Porch Company didn’t just grow a strong organic traffic channel by publishing consistently. They have a ton of backlinks to help the content rank. Backlinks come from creating great content – but also active promotion and digital outreach. Reaching out to influencers and others who will carry your message for you.

The Korte Company

Korte is a design-build construction company with a diverse set of industry experience and expertise. They are another great example, like Superwarm of a website that works, for today’s buyer.

What their website does well

One of the best things Korte does well is showcase expertise and thought leadership within their verticals. Let’s walk through one example to see how this plays out. Let’s say you are a project manager assigned to work with your local city on building a new hangar at your regional airport. But you’re not sure where to start. Like most people, you might start with a search.

There may not be a ton of monthly searches for this phrase every month, but those searching it are pretty good candidates for a firm like Korte. Look at that, they have some content where they share their expertise. Let’s click through and see what we find.

From blogs to resources, Korte has everything I need at this early stage. This guide, start to finish looks promising.

Before I get my copy, I share some information about myself. Korte uses that to follow up with me.
construction marketing guide

Construction/Building Website Best Practices

What all of the examples show, is that building modern marketing programs require a website that does more than just showcases your latest work. The three key themes from these case studies are: conversion, content and user experience.

Construction websites that convert

Make sure your website is built to convert. It’s not enough to just have a contact us or a request quote. We want multiple conversion paths so we can build a marketing database and sales pipeline of active prospects.

Marketing content throughout the journey

The best way to build websites that convert, is to host marketing content throughout the buyer journey on your website. Provide resources when people are early in the process of research all the way up to the point where they are comparing you to the competitors and need a final nudge.

User experience that’s concise

Make sure users can get through your site to the goals that best suit them. From research to contact, make the flow intuitive and helpful, don’t bog down their journey by cramming everything about your company – on every single page.

Final word

We’d love to hear from you. What construction sites have you found that are built for the modern buyer? Leave us a comment with a link and why you think it works well for today’s buyer.

Manufacturing Marketing – Building a Modern Growth Machine

There are a lot of organizations that rely on face to face relationships to increase revenue. In manufacturing, especially if you are regional or specialized – the value of your network is particularly important. But often, as organizations that focus only on relationships start seeking growth, the role different roles marketing and sales play in the pipeline unfolds. Sales (the relationship)is a short-term player. The hunter, sometimes gatherer, who finds revenue now.

Manufacturing marketing, on the other hand, is out sowing opportunity for tomorrow and next month and next quarter. As digital media advances and demographics change, marketing takes an even more active role in building pipeline and businesses that rely on relationships, like manufacturing, need to shift their focus on building a modern marketing strategy to attract and engage a modern buyer.