Lake One’s Paid Media Glossary

Paid advertising is often a great way to increase traffic and sales as you’re growing and sustaining your online presence. But the lingo can be a little confusing if you aren’t used to hearing it every day. To help, here’s Lake One’s paid media glossary of terms, including a breakdown of the basic types of paid media to help identify which ones might be a fit for you.

Paid Media Glossary

Types of Paid Media

1) Retargeting Ads

Retargeting is a form of paid media that serves ads to users who have already engaged with your site or social media page. The goal of retargeting is to re-engage users with your brand.

Because retargeting works via cookie tracking, it allows you to target your ads to a specific behavior. For instance, you can retarget an ad to people who abandoned their online shopping carts or viewed a specific webpage.

Pros to retargeting: Great for keeping your brand top-of-mind and moving users further along the funnel. 

Cons to retargeting: Not a strategy for acquiring new visitors.

2) Display Ads 

Display ads, or sometimes called Banner Ads, are static image ads. These are the ads that you see when browsing the web, outside of social media or Google. Display ads can be run as a form of retargeting, so this is why you might see an ad for the eCommerce site you just visited pop up on your fav news site. Display ads can also be interest-based: i.e. getting an ad for Recipes.com after browsing a few different sites for Thanksgiving dinner planning.

Display ads on Google all run through what’s called the Google Display Network. This is a vast network of over 2 million websites that are connected to Google and able to display your ad. Google estimates that this network is able to reach up to 90% of the internet.

Here’s are some examples of display ads not based on retargeting.

Paid Media Glossary

Pros to Display Ads: Retargeting through display ads can be especially effective when retargeting.

Cons to Display Ads: Display ads usually have low click rates and are typically used for awareness campaigns.

3) Pay Per Click Ads

Pay per click, or PPC, is what the industry calls advertising within search engine results. These are the “paid results” you see on Google (or Yahoo or Bing, etc.) before the organic search results display. You will only pay for an ad if it gets clicked, and the amount you pay will vary greatly depending on your targeting.

Paid Media Glossary

Pros to PPC: Effective way to get to the top of the search engine results and generate traffic. 

Cons to PPC: Can be expensive depending on your targeted keywords and often requires a higher level of expertise to be effective.

4) Social Ads

Paid Media Glossary

Socials ads are advertising served on any social media platform. Facebook and Instagram ads can be managed together while Twitter and LinkedIn need to be done directly through their ad serving platforms. (Here are some tips on LinkedIn advertising.) Depending on your audience’s social media savviness, advertising on these platforms can be hugely successful. 

Here’s an example of a retargeting social ad. These shoes and the cellphone case are specific products I’ve reviewed recently.

Pros to Social Ads: Platforms range in expense but are generally cheaper than other options plus offer the ability to target very niche groups, especially when using LinkedIn for B2B purposes.

Cons to Social Ads: Focus is typically on visuals of ads and some platforms, like Instagram, have high aesthetics expectation. It can involve trial and error when getting started.

Targeting Options

1) Mobile

Ads served just to mobile users and not to desktop.

2) Native

Ads that blend into the environment and do not look like ads; typically on social media.

3) Geofencing

Targeting an ad to a specific geographical area- can be down to specific zip codes.

4) Dayparting

Only serving an ad during specific times of the day (such as business hours) to increase targeting based on persona search habits.

5) Exact Match

In PPC ads, exact match ads are only served when your exact keywords are searched (e.g. exact match for “Best St. Paul Moving Company” won’t serve an ad for “Best Rated St. Paul Moving Company”).

6) Phrase Match 

In PPC ads, phrase match ads are served when there is a contextual match for your keywords. (e.g. phrase match for “Best St. Paul Moving Company” will serve an ad for “Best Rated St. Paul Moving Company”).

7) Bid

The budget you’re willing to pay for your ad to display. Bids can be set by click, impression, and/or on a daily/monthly basis.

How to Pick the Best Digital Marketing Agency for Your Company

Paid Media KPIs

1) Impressions

How many people have seen your ad. Unique Impressions are the individual people who viewed your ad vs Total Impressions which counts each and every view independently, even if one person viewed your ad more than once.

2) Click or Clickthrough

The total clicks on your ad.

3) Clickthrough Rate

The percentage of impressions that received a click.

4) Cost per Click

How much you’re paying on average to receive a click on your ad.

5) Cost per Acquisition

The average cost you’re paying for a goal to be completed (a goal can be a purchase, a form submitted, etc.)

6 Common Misconceptions about Digital Marketing

Digital marketing encompasses all of the different marketing techniques that take place online. It can include any of the following, and more:

  1. Websites/Landing pages
  2. Social media marketing (SMM)
  3. Inbound marketing
  4. Content marketing
  5. Email marketing
  6. Pay-Per-Click (PPC)
  7. Search Engine Marketing (SEM)
  8. Search Engine Optimization (SEO)
  9. Affiliate & Influencer marketing

There are all kinds of digital marketing companies and experts, critics and avid fans, so there is a lot of information (and misinformation) out there. Here are 6 common misconceptions about digital marketing.

 Misconceptions about Digital Marketing

1) Digital marketing is best suited for large businesses.

A major goal of digital marketing is to increase brand awareness and grow a business. Most small businesses have big aspirations- they’d like to become more well-known with strong desires to find and help their ideal customers. Digital marketing creates opportunities for small businesses that may not be possible with an offline-only presence.

Think an inbound digital strategy might be right for you? Click to find out.

Digital marketing allows you to reach potential customers both far and wide. Many successful small businesses have used digital marketing to grow and scale on a global level even without having a physical location. Moreover, social media provides a means to highlight important information and allows you to have one-on-one or one-to-many conversations, often without any money spent. It’s one of the more cost-effective ways to spread the word about the good work your company is doing. In many ways, it provides an equal opportunity to businesses of all shapes and sizes. You can start small and as you start seeing results, increase the time and money you put into it to increase your returns.

2) Digital marketing doesn’t need to play a part in company-wide goals.

Whatever your larger sales and company goals are, digital marketing should be a part of it. That is to say, it should be included in your overarching company strategy, aligned with your goals, brand, and vision from top to bottom. Sometimes marketing as a whole (not just digital) is put into a corner left to fend for itself. However, we know from experience that the most successful programs are aligned with the rest of the company and aimed at the same goals. Learn more about how you can align sales and marketing here.

3) Digital marketing is basically just creating a website.

If you spend time creating a stunning, interactive website and don’t do anything to promote it, how will people possibly find it? There are thousands of new websites popping up every single day; digital marketing is how you drive traffic to your website.

SEM/SEO paired with a solid content strategy, if done right, allow your information to be found when people are searching for what you offer. Once people actually reach your website, digital marketing efforts will continue to motivate people into a purchase or bottom of funnel action such as submitting a contact form. 

misconceptions about digital marketing

4) It’s too difficult to measure and track digital marketing’s ROI.

There are hundreds of affordable and easy to use tools and methods to track and measure your digital marketing efforts. Many of these platforms are essentially plug-and-play and can be implemented without tech expertise. Even if you need to pull in IT, tracking clicks, conversion rates, site traffic, etc. is far easier than tracking the effectiveness of a radio ad, for instance.  

No matter the method or tool utilized, one of the most important things is to be organized in the beginning and set definitive goals for your different digital marketing efforts. If you start with a SMART goal in mind including specific factors that point to success, along with a timeframe for when to evaluate, that starts you off on the right foot to track how things have gone since the beginning.  

5) Once digital marketing is set, you can forget it.

One of the most exciting and potentially difficult things about digital marketing is the fact that it is constantly evolving and shifting. What was once converting yesterday may not work tomorrow. For instance, short video content (15-45 seconds) was all the rage, but now 1:30-3 minute videos seem to be consumer preference. 

The constant change in the field means that you will need to keep your information and methods up to date or risk falling behind and getting lost in the shuffle. Another example is how Google updates its search algorithms continually. They won’t disclose what is actually included in the algorithm, but we do know that their algorithm values fresh, new information including info on your blogs and websites.

If you don’t have the time or desire to keep up with digital marketing methods or maintain fresh, new information, there are many effective digital marketing companies dedicated to doing that work for you.  

6) Digital Marketing needs to be perfect before launching.

One of the greatest things about digital marketing is it’s different for every company and even every initiative. Your company and offerings are as unique as your customers, and the best way to find what works for how to reach them is through trial and error.  

Here at Lake One, we believe in progress over perfection. So, don’t be afraid to try new things, keep track of what you’ve tried, and the results of those efforts. Put more effort into utilizing the methods that work well and simply let go of the things that don’t.

Crush B2B Lead Gen Goals with LinkedIn Sponsored Content

It’s a common story. Inbound marketers do their diligence developing buyer personas; cultivating content plans informed by keyword research throughout the buyer’s journey designed to attract and convert B2B leads. We launch our campaign to the world. Check for form notifications. Hours go by. Days. *DING* WE GOT ONE! – oh, wait… it’s a guest blogging service in Croatia.

Well, shoot. Here’s the deal: it’s not that the inbound research is necessarily wrong. But the content and conversion paths are a long game. Driving B2B leads with content can’t always rely on the grit of our organic and earned efforts. Especially in the short term. Take this data from Hubspot for example:

LinkedIn B2B Lead Gen

It usually takes 3 – 6 months before we start seeing the blogs we’re posting today really start picking up steam in attracting the contact volume that can start to scale our business. It takes 12 months to really go crazy.

So what’s a marketer to do? Help crush your B2B lead gen goals with some help from the social network built for B2B. LinkedIn. If you sell B2B, you should already consider LinkedIn marketing. What we’re going to look at today, is sponsored content.

LinkedIn B2B Lead Gen

Get to Know LinkedIn Sponsored Content

LinkedIn Sponsored content is the promotion of a post from a page that appears natively in the LinkedIn feed [psst, here are some post ideas.] You can include a link to your site or landing page or build a lead generation form within LinkedIn that lets LinkedIn users request content, information, or other contact from your organization with the click of a button. The form will automatically populate with information from their LinkedIn profile.

Because it behaves like a native post you get the benefit of the engagement functionality resulting in brand awareness via the social nature of the network. This reach is extended beyond that of your company page with the assistance of an ad budget.

LinkedIn B2B Lead Gen

Setting up Sponsored Content

Getting your sponsored content campaign up and running requires a LinkedIn advertising account. For a complete guide to doing that, check out the Getting Started with LinkedIn Advertising chapter in our LinkedIn Marketing Guide.

Some things to consider as you plan your advertising strategy.

  • Budget
    • LinkedIn, like most online ad platforms enable total and daily budget parameters. Bids can be set per click or impression if sending InMail. Because of the niche element of LinkedIn (focus on work) costs are generally higher than you’ll see on other networks.
  • Audience
    • There’s a multitude of options for targeting ads from audience development around LinkedIn profile parameters like job title, professional interest, industry. etc.. But another powerful tool is combining LinkedIn with your own data whether using matched audiences like those who visit your website or for account-based targeting. All of this is covered in depth in our LinkedIn Marketing Guide.

Aligning Sponsored Content with Inbound

The LinkedIn B2B lead generation goal crushing comes in when LinkedIn sponsored content aligns with a well crafted inbound marketing program. If your marketing plan and website is built to be a lead gen machine, give the machine some extra horsepower by plugging in another channel.

First, look to your personas when you build out your audience targeting in LinkedIn advertising. Structure campaigns around them, their stage in the journey, and use the LinkedIn Insights tag to create audience groups for people who engage with content as they move through the funnel, adjusting the content you show them during their journey.

Second, make sure that the audiences are aligned with the timing delivered in your email nurture sequences. The goal is to create a multi-channel soft touch to attract and nurture your prospects along their journey.

Finally, once a prospect has achieved the desired behavior, make sure to exclude them from LinkedIn sponsored content both to conserve ad budget but to also deliver a positive marketing experience.

For more information, here are some additional ways you use LinkedIn for Lead Gen.

5 Reasons the HubSpot LinkedIn ad integration has us swooning

Hubspot gave us a nice Valentine’s day gift today – integrating LinkedIn ads to their ad product. As inbound marketers who look at a multichannel approach that includes ads – this is welcomed news (especially because we found a lot of problems with alternative solutions). On this Valentine’s day, we’re swooning over this product update. So what does this mean for B2B marketers looking to add LinkedIn marketing to their mix? What’s got us all excited about the Hubspot LinkedIn ad integration? Let’s break it down.

Benefits of hubspot linkedin ad integration

Seamlessly sync Linkedin leads with Hubspot CRM

This is probably the most exciting thing we’re looking at. Historically, you’ve either had to use third party tools like Zapier to connect Linkedin and Hubspot or assign someone manually to go in daily to download your lead list and update your CRM. Yuck! With the native integration to Hubspot, when a prospect submits a lead gen ad, they get created as a new contact in Hubspot (winning!)

Easily report ROI through the CRM

LinkedIn’s ad product is coming along from where it was even last year, but reporting ROI is still a struggle. Now, closing the loop at the contact level, you can report ROI either by assigning a static value to all contacts or with real data from your CRM’s pipeline and opportunities that flow into it from your LinkedIn marketing activity.

Auto tracking

Another area of challenge with LinkedIn ads, is referral sourcing and tracking. Ads don’t always seem to get tracked well in Hubspot – now, campaigns are auto tracked. Of course, you can still append additional parameters, but if the idea of tagging a bunch of blogs that you’re running as sponsored content sounds laborious – take a breath.

Close the gap on remarketing

Similar to Facebook, reaching customer and prospect lists with audiences is even easier now with a direct connection between your CRM. Shortening any step in a day full of tasks is a welcomed event.

Hubspot LinkedIn Ads

Very B2B friendly

What we’re most excited about, is that while Google and Facebook have their place, for B2B clients who really benefit from inbound, sometimes Google and Facebook is hard to advocate for in aligning with inbound further up in the funnel. Now, with the LinkedIn ads product for Hubspot, it feels truly useful across a customer’s journey and fully aligned with the mantra of being helpful.

Word of caution

When connecting, Hubspot will sync past LeadGen Forms. This has caused some weird timeline details on some portals we’re working in. The benefits of the sync going forward far outweigh any quirks with some of the retroactive data, but if you see some historical changes to the way you were tracking your Lead Gen Form contacts, be aware there is a historical sync that takes place.

Leveraging Digital to Reach Your Credit Union’s Hispanic Field of Membership

The U.S. Hispanic population continues to be a rapidly growing segment of super consumers and one that is increasingly digitally savvy. U.S. census data shows that since the 1970s, the population of Hispanics in the United States has grown 592%. In the first decade of the 2000s alone, Hispanics made up more than half of total U.S. population growth.

Reaching Your Credit Unions Hispanic Members

This segment of the U.S. population packs a powerful economic punch with buying power estimated to reach $1.5 trillion this year (2015).

With such a large demographic segment in population and economic scope, credit unions with a large Hispanic population falling within their field of membership need to tap into this opportunity.

Historically, beliefs around Hispanic marketing has focused on reaching family units and traditional media as core to Hispanic marketing.

New research into the online behaviors of the U.S. Hispanic population sheds light on behaviors that credit union marketers whose field of memberships include Hispanic populations should take note of.

Hispanic Population More Attentive To Online Advertising

Historically, the family unit and television have been key pillars in Hispanic marketing plans. However research from Google indicates that U.S. Hispanics use online sources at a rate higher than the general internet population (54% vs. 46%) throughout their purchase decision favoring online above family, radio and tv.

When it comes to online advertising, 66% of Hispanics pay attention to ads a full 20 percent more than the general internet populations.

Key takeaway: Online advertising is a crucial new pillar of a modern, Hispanic marketing planning. If additional budget can’t be secured, consider reallocating from traditional media to digital channels to reach this crucial segment. 

Search Is A Crucial Step In The Journey

In the same Google report,  nearly 80% of Hispanics say search his their #1 online tool in gathering information for decision making.

Combine this with the rate of adoption for mobile as a primary tool for online activity (42% vs. 33% for non-Hispanic according to Specific Media) search, both paid and organic and mobile optimized is critical.

Key Takeaway: Search is a crucial tool. Credit unions should look to bolster their paid search position and ramp up efforts in organic search with strong social media and content marketing efforts. Support all of this with a mobile friend user experience on your credit union’s marketing website and landing pages or microsites. 

Spanish, Culture and What Matters

Finally, culture, naturally, is crucial. Google reports that 70% of Hispanics find a website’s cultural relevance to be important when gathering information. Nearly half feel more favorable towards a brand who shows cultural relevance which is important because research from the Pew Hispanic Trends team shows it takes a great deal to get Hispanics to switch brands.

So what matters, culturally speaking?

Well, according to Google, the notion that Spanish “always” has to be used, is outdated.

Search trends for Spanish keywords are rising, 65%-500% from 2011 – 2014 across product categories. However in their research, only about 1/3 of respondents are dominantly Spanish speaking and nearly 95% are comfortable consuming English content online.

A thoughtful approach to blending both Spanish and English seems like a good approach. Overall the key is to be relevant so if a credit union ventures into the Spanish language with ads and content, do it well.

Key takeaway: Culture is important. Credit Union’s should be thoughtful about creating experiences from ads to content and microsites that reflect Hispanic culture. That doesn’t mean everything has to be spanish. Take a thoughtful approach and whatever your credit union does, do it thoroughly. Winning the Hispanic population is a loyal population and worth the time to do it right. 

“Mobile Friendly” and Your Credit Union: Lessons From Google’s New Search Algorithm

credit union mobile search

Mobilegeddon has come and gone. On the morning of April 22nd, the sun still rose in the east and set in the west and the moon, as far as I can tell hasn’t fallen from the sky or changed the tides in any unusual way.

Still, despite the hyperbole, the changes announced by Google in early 2015, to how it would calculate and rank sites in mobile search has implications credit unions would be wise to take note of.

The two largest implications are the effect on organic and paid traffic with a third implication around what does this mean about overall predictions in consumer tends?

How does mobilegeddon affect organic traffic

It’s now been a week since the algorithm change, and while sources differ on the exact impact, the consensus is that the impact isn’t as major as previously expected.

The mobile friendly ranking signal is just one of many signals in determining rank and for larger, established credit unions, your brand and recognition factor still carries significant relevance weight across your search ranking.

However, despite the less than armageddon-like destruction of mobile search ranking, the shift in Google’s attribution of mobile value isn’t something to take likely for two additional reasons.

How will mobile affect search media buys

The same day mobilegeddon was wreaking fear in the hearts of organic search marketers,  a mobile friendly tag was spotted in adwords copy on Google Canada.

Photo via The Sem Post
Photo via The Sem Post
The official statement from Google was that it was a test and mobile friendly does not, at this time, affect quality score.

However,  that’s not to say that a roll out in the future wouldn’t affect quality score, in particular for those targeting mobile devices and location.

With all this emphasis on mobile, whether it affects your search ranking or your bid costs and ad position is almost a moot point.

The reality is that mobile as a means of accessing information and making purchase decisions is a significant consumer trend.

Mobile as a consumer trend and how it affects your strategy

All of these changes by Google should capture your attention if for no other reason than this: mobile is one of the most significant shifts in the way consumers seek information, make decisions and engage with the world around them .

Sometime this year it’s predicted that mobile search volume will exceed desktop search volume while the number of mobile users has already exceeded the number of desktop users.

mobile searchesmobiles users

Consumption of media on mobile devices including television and movies continues to rise while attention to interactive advertising on these device outpaces ads in traditional media.

So what does all of this mean? Marketing and digital member experiences need to expand beyond just creating mobile banking solutions that members want to use.

Ad buys, content, marketing sites and engagement efforts all need to focus on their mobile counterparts as well for every stop around the digital ecosystem.